and down below

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Apr 9
sixpenceee:

10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband- a 30 year old man
Here’s what I found after looking into it. 
Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding. 
On the advice of her father’s second wife, she went directly to court to seek a divorce. After waiting for half a day, she was noticed by a judge, Mohammed al-għadha, who gave her refuge. He had both her father and husband taken into custody.
Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali’s case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an 8 year old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009.
BUT In 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home and is withholding her money granted by publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa.
I GOT THE INFORMATION FROM THIS WIKI PAGE
Also this girl has her own book

sixpenceee:

10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband- a 30 year old man

Here’s what I found after looking into it. 

Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding.

On the advice of her father’s second wife, she went directly to court to seek a divorce. After waiting for half a day, she was noticed by a judge, Mohammed al-għadha, who gave her refuge. He had both her father and husband taken into custody.

Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali’s case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an 8 year old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009.

BUT In 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home and is withholding her money granted by publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa.

I GOT THE INFORMATION FROM THIS WIKI PAGE

Also this girl has her own book

Apr 7

sixpenceee:

If you thought the post on twins sharing consciousness was awesome, wait until you hear this.

A 44-year-old French man one day went to the trip to the doctor’s because he felt a pain in his left leg. He’s a married man with two kids and a steady job.

Doctor’s found that he had hydrocephalus as a child (when your brain is filled with fluids) so they decided to run some brain scans.

What they found was that the majority of his head was filled with fluid. Over time, the buildup caused his lateral ventricles to swell so much that his brain had been flattened to a thin sheet.

Doctors estimated that his brain mass had been reduced by at most 70%, affecting the areas in charge of motion, language, emotion, and, well, everything.

Shockingly, he was fine. While his IQ was only 75, he wasn’t mentally challenged. He held a steady job, raised a family, and didn’t have trouble interacting with others.

Over time, his brain had adapted to all that pressure, and even though he had fewer neurons that most, Jacques was still a fully functional human being.

The doctors drained the fluid and while his brain is much smaller now, he is still a healthy individual with a normal life.

SOURCE

Apr 7

calleo:

highenergyjewtrino:

A friend linked me these because he thought they’d be relevant to me, he was extremely correct.  If these pieces of advice aren’t relevant to you, improve yourself until they are.

[source]

A good chunk of Tumblr could benefit from this.

Apr 5
autisticadvocacy:

[Image is a world Autism Awareness Day logo that has a stylized globe and sun with person-shapes holding hands around it. “World Autism Awareness Day” is below it.]
active-rva:

April is, among other things, Autism Awareness Month, so you may see tables for autism advocacy organizations around (especially on college campuses). Do not donate to Autism Speaks- they have no autistic people on their board, haverefused to hire parents with autistic children, use legal threats to shut down criticism of their organization from people with autism, adheres to the widely-discredited theory that vaccination causes autism (in that they dump money into researching the connection), and are generally not useful or well-liked by actual autistic people.Generally, the endeavor is like Susan G. Koemen, a big fundraising loop (they sell products to ‘raise awareness’ and then use those proceeds to sell more products) that fails to benefit anyone but those pulling salaries from the effort, who are notably not autistic. Only 4% of their budget goes to services for autistic people and their families. Instead, donate to the Autistic Self Advocacy Network.

autisticadvocacy:

[Image is a world Autism Awareness Day logo that has a stylized globe and sun with person-shapes holding hands around it. “World Autism Awareness Day” is below it.]

active-rva:

April is, among other things, Autism Awareness Month, so you may see tables for autism advocacy organizations around (especially on college campuses). 

Do not donate to Autism Speaks- they have no autistic people on their board, haverefused to hire parents with autistic childrenuse legal threats to shut down criticism of their organization from people with autismadheres to the widely-discredited theory that vaccination causes autism (in that they dump money into researching the connection), and are generally not useful or well-liked by actual autistic people.

Generally, the endeavor is like Susan G. Koemen, a big fundraising loop (they sell products to ‘raise awareness’ and then use those proceeds to sell more products) that fails to benefit anyone but those pulling salaries from the effort, who are notably not autistic. Only 4% of their budget goes to services for autistic people and their families

Instead, donate to the Autistic Self Advocacy Network.

Apr 3
iwillnotshavemyvagina:

From Facebook
After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

iwillnotshavemyvagina:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

(Source: jnenifre)

Apr 3

GUYS THIS IS REALLY IMPORTANT PLEASE DON’T SCROLL PAST IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!

awesomeavocadolove:

furbearingbrick:

ereriislife15:

I’m doing a persuasive speech and this would really help me out.

If you think animals should be adopted from shelters, reblog.

If you think animals should be bought from pet stores, like.

*REBLOGS FURIOUSLY*

I’m going to like this and see how many butthurt messages I get in tomorrow’s inbox. haha.

Apr 2

thesame5songs:

vanconcastiel:

eridan-amporadorable:

neurologically:

deanspelvis:

milesjai:

madlori:

leogursky:

Missouri Pastor’s Fiery Speech Against Equal Rights for Homosexuals Has Stunning Twist Ending

Pardon my French, but this Pastor is a badass mothafucka.

The entire speech is further enhanced by the insight provided in this YouTube comment:

image

(Source)

Watch till the end.  Trust me.

Someone give this man an award. 

He literally just slayed their assholes open wow

Watch how uncomfortable the people in the background get when the speech turns around. They were probably agreeing with everything he had said up until then.

Give this man a gold medal to go along with those cast-iron balls.

This guy is the BEST

(Source: thesecretaryofnagriculture)

Apr 1

http://touchofgrey37.tumblr.com/post/81404258071/bigbardafree-so-did-you-guys-hear-we-caught-a

bigbardafree:

So, did you guys hear we caught a terrorist last week?

thepoliticalfreakshow:

So, did you guys hear we caught a terrorist last week?

Being that it is part…

Apr 1

sixpenceee:

How could I not share this really cool thing I found with everyone?

More pictures and artist credit

Apr 1

sixpenceee:

Scientists in Singapore have developed a simple and brightly colored method to see if someone has tampered with your drink with GHB, commonly known along with Rohypnol as a date rape drug

Researchers at the National University of Singapore have created a liquid that, when mixed with a beverage containing GHB, changes into a fluorescent color in less than 30 seconds.

Like Rohypnol, the drug is colorless, ordorless and tasteless and thus easy to hide in alcoholic drinks. Though people can test for GHB on paper (some campuses are even testing special coasters that can tell if a sample of a drink has GHB when poured on the coaster), the researchers believe this new method will be faster, simpler and more obvious (thanks to the bright orange color your drink turns if tainted).

SOURCE

exaltedreviewaverse:

ohmymckirk:

so-um-yeah:

aloistrancyhive:

breathe-squeeze-follow-through:

26 Male Survivors Of Sexual Assault Quoting The People Who Attacked Them

http://www.buzzfeed.com/spenceralthouse/male-survivors-of-sexual-assault-quoting-the-people-who-a

This needs more notes.

no one seems to care if they are guys 

reminder that rape and sexual abuse happens to everyone, not just girls

I think the disturbing part is how very similar the threats are.

reddawnrumble:

lizlizlovely:

kleat:

izzebeth:

this is so so so important !!

important

that last statistic 

IMPORTANT

Please also visit songsagainstslavery.com to help out with raising money to help trafficked victims!

(Source: green-berret)

sixpenceee:

FIRE MUMMIES OF THE PHILIPPINES

What makes the Fire Mummies unique is their process of mummification.

That mummification began shortly after a person died, where he would digest a very salty drink. After his death, his corpse was washed and set over a fire, thus drying the fluids. Smoke from tobacco was blown into the mouth to dry the body’s inside and internal organs. Eventually, herbs were rubbed into the body.

The practice of that mummification ended, since Spaniards colonized the Philippines the 1500s.

MORE INFORMATION

ANOTHER POST ON MUMMIES

(Source: shardeva)